Asylum Relies On Strong Facts And Smart Legal Counsel To Achieve

For many immigrants, the United States not only offers great opportunity, but refuge from persecution or threats to their life that they would face in their own country. To qualify for asylum status in the United States, an applicant must meet the definition of refugee as stated in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). It states that a refugee is:

"Any person who is outside any country of such person's nationality or, in the case of a person having no nationality, is outside any country in which such person habitually resided, and who is unable or unwilling to avail himself or herself of the protection of that country because of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion."

The attorneys at Rodriguez Bell & DiFranco Law Office, LLC, help individuals and families seeking asylum navigate the process and accomplish their goal.

Meeting A High Burden Of Proof

An asylum applicant must prove that his or her fear of persecution is well-founded. In these cases, a persecutor must be the government, an individual or a group that the government has shown unable or unwilling to control. The asylum applicant will be asked to testify before the Board of Immigration Appeals and provide corroborating evidence if possible.

It is critical to work with an immigration lawyer who has experience building strong asylum cases and presenting them in court. Each of our attorneys focuses entirely on immigration law and has practiced in this area for more than 10 years.

We Know How To Prove Asylum

While there is no INA definition of persecution, it is often defined as "the infliction of suffering or harm upon those who differ in a way regarded as offensive." Most often, it is defined as a threat to life or freedom of any individual based on race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership of a particular social group. Persecution typically involves one of these five actions:

  • Physical harm
  • Emotional or psychological harm
  • Disproportionate punishment for a crime
  • Severe discrimination and economic persecution
  • Severe robbery or extortion

Facts are essential in asylum cases. We have helped numerous clients successfully receive asylum status and followed up by helping them apply for permanent residency. We can answer your questions regarding asylum and recommend an effective course of action during a free consultation. For your convenience, we have offices in Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio. Call or use our online contact form to schedule an appointment.